Vegan recipes from Scotland
Japanese Vegan in Scotland

head_1head_2

Vegan Pad Thai Traditional Style


  • 2012/12/02

'Vegan Pad Thai Traditional Style' -- 2 Servings

DSC_3600.jpg

INGREDIENTS

125g flat rice noodles (5mm)
Half onion, sliced
3 cloves garlic, minced
100g deep-fried tofu (If you can't get it, you can make it easily. See vegan memo at the bottom of this post!)
200g broccoli, cut into small pieces
2 Tbls tamarind paste
2 Tbls sugar
4 Tbls soya sauce
1 Tsp crushed chilli
Handful bean sprouts
1/4 cup toasted peanuts
Salt & pepper to taste
Coriander to garnish
Peanuts to garnish
2 slices lime


Directions:
1. Put the rice noodles into a big bowl, add hot water and leave for 15 min. Drain and set aside.
2. Make the pad thai sauce. Mix the tamarind paste, sugar, soya sauce and chilli. Set aside.
3. Heat vegetable oil in a wok or big frying pan over high heat, add onion, garlic, deep-fried tofu and broccoli. Stir-fry until vegetables are soft.
4. Add the drained rice noodles into the wok and stir-fry for 1 min.
5. Add the pad thai sauce, bean sprouts and peanuts to the wok and stir-fry for 1-2 min. Add salt and pepper to taste.
6. Transfer everything to a dish and put some coriander leaves, lime and peanuts on the top. EAT!



I veganized pad thai! Pad thai's spicy and rich taste will make you feel satisfied! The tamarind paste which I used in the sauce is common ingredients in some asian cooking. It has unique sour and rich taste. You can find it out in an Asian supermarket I think. Try it out!

Vegan Memo:
- Sometimes I use deep-fried tofu instead of meat. It is so easy to make so please try it. Direction below:
1. Drain tofu well.
2. Slice the tofu into 1cm thick rectangles.
3. Deep-fry the tofu until the surface is crispy and light brown.



Nutrition FactsPer a parson
Calories - 317.7
Total Fat - 10.8 g
  Saturated Fat - 1.6 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat - 3.0 g
  Monounsaturated Fat - 4.5 g
Cholesterol - 0.0 mg
Sodium - 126.9 mg
  Potassium - 447.7 mg
Total Carbohydrate - 46.0 g
  Dietary Fiber - 9.2 g
  Sugars - 10.4 g
Protein - 12.8 g
Powered By Spark Recipes


DSC_3601.jpg

Vegan Spicy Miso Flavor Fried-Udon


  • 2012/06/23

'Vegan Spicy Miso Flavor Fried-Udon' -- 2 Servings

DSC_1659.jpg

INGREDIENTS

2 servings udon noodles
Half onion
3 leaves chinese cabbage
Half carrot
Half green pepper
2 spring onions
1 clove garlic

- Spicy Miso Sauce
2 Tbls red miso or brown miso paste
2 Tbls mirin
1 Tbls sake or white wine
2 Tsp sugar
1 Tsp chinese chili bean sauce 'toban jan' (or similar asian chili bean paste - NOT hot sauce)


Directions:
1. First make the spring onion for garnish ('Shiraga-negi' in Japanese): Cut off the bottom 15cm of the spring onions, then cut in half widthwise. Make a lengthwise cut down the centre. Open the spring onions like paper, slice them into thin strips. Put the strips into a bowl of water.
2. Boil noodles according to package directions and remove from water. Wash in cold water and drain. Set aside. Mix all ingredients for the spicy miso sauce in a bowl and set aside.
3. Heat a little vegetable oil in a frying pan, add minced garlic. After the garlic starts to smell nice, add sliced onion, cabbage, carrot, green pepper and the leftover parts of the spring onions. Fry all of that over high heat.
4. After the vegetables are lightly cooked, add the cooked udon noodles and the sauce. Fry until the sauce has coated everything. Place noodles on a plate, garnish with the 'Shiraga-negi' from the first step. EAT!!



Udon noodles are a traditional Japanese vegan noodle which are easy to find in other countries. The traditional way to eat udon is in a hot dashi soup, or with a soya sauce base sauce which is not vegan. This is one other vegan way to eat this kind of noodle. The spicy miso sauce has nice strong miso flavor. If you like miso soup, I bet you will like this recipe too!

Vegan Memo:
- The 'Shiraga-negi' will get curly after you put it in water.
- Vegetables shouldn't be over cooked. The texture of the vegetables is important! You want them to still have some "bite" after cooking.



Nutrition FactsPer Serving
Calories - 396.6
Total Fat - 4.0 g
  Saturated Fat - 0.0 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat - 0.0 g
  Monounsaturated Fat - 0.0 g
Cholesterol - 0.0 mg
Sodium - 1,845.9 mg
  Potassium - 250.3 mg
Total Carbohydrate - 74.5 g
  Dietary Fiber - 3.1 g
  Sugars - 14.2 g
Protein - 11.7 g
Powered By Spark Recipes


DSC_1663.jpg

Cold Pad Thai with Spicy Peanut Sauce


  • 2012/04/22

'Cold Pad Thai with Spicy Peanut Sauce' -- 4 Servings

IMGP2052.jpg

INGREDIENTS

300g rice noodles(2-3mm)
1 carrot
2 tomato
1 cucumber
1 red or yellow pepper
Tosted sesame seeds, to garnish
Coriander, as much as you want

- Peanut Sauce
4 Tbls peanut butter (I used crunchy)
1 Tbls soya sauce
2 Tbls rice vinegar
2 Tbls water
2 cloves garlic
Ginger (same amount as garlic)
1 Tbls Sriracha sauce (or other kind of Asian chili sauce)
1/2 Tbls sugar


Directions:
1. Boil noodles a little bit longer than package directions and remove from water to drain. Cool the noodles down in the cold water and transfer to a dish.
2. Make the sauce. Press or grate garlic and ginger and mix with all ingredients for the sauce.
3. Slice all the vegetables, place on top of noodles. Pour the sauce on the dish, put coriander and sesame seeds on top to garnish. EAT!



Pad thai is a Thai style stir-fried rice noodle dish. I made a cold version of it. The combination of the spicy peanut sauce and coriander is the best on cold noodles. You can easily make a raw food version if you use sliced vegetables instead of the rice noodles!

Vegan Memo:
- If you don't have crunchy peanut butter, use smooth.
- If you use sweetened peanut butter, you don't need to add any sugar.
- You should make the rice noodles softer than usual when you eat rice noodles cold.



Nutrition FactsPer person
Calories - 253.8
Total Fat - 10.3 g
  Saturated Fat - 0.2 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat - 0.5 g
  Monounsaturated Fat - 0.4 g
Cholesterol - 0.0 mg
Sodium - 259.8 mg
  Potassium - 88.0 mg
Total Carbohydrate - 33.6 g
  Dietary Fiber - 3.9 g
  Sugars - 9.5 g
Protein - 6.6 g
Powered By Spark Recipes


IMGP2051.jpg

Vegan Soya Milk Ramen


  • 2012/02/07

'Vegan Soya Milk Ramen' -- 4 servings

IMG_0134.jpg

INGREDIENTS


4 cloves garlic
Same amount of ginger
Fresh red chili
2 spring onions, top green part
2 Tbls vegetable oil
1600ml unsweetened soya milk
2 cubes vegetable stock (or vegan chicken stock)
1/2 tsp cracked black pepper
Salt to taste
Sesame oil to taste

8 slices pumpkin (or butternut squash)
Half pack mushrooms
Vegetable oil

One block tofu (around 350g)
Potato starch (or corn starch) to cover tofu

4 servings ramen noodles
Half pack bean sprouts

Spring onion to garnish
Sesame seeds to garnish

Directions:

1. Place vegetable oil, minced garlic and ginger, chopped chili and crushed spring onion into a sauce pan and fry over super low flame. After garlic changes colour, add soya milk, vegetable stock and pepper, heat and stop before it comes to a boil. Add salt to taste and sesame oil to flavor. (If you let it get to boiling point, it will separate and look gross. So please be careful!)
2. While heating the soya milk soup, prepare other ingredients. Heat vegetable oil in frying pan and fry sliced pumpkin and mushrooms and transfer to a separate dish.
3. Pour and heat vegetable oil in the frying pan to deep fry tofu (1cm deep is enough). Drain off tofu, cut it into 12 pieces and dry it on a paper towel. Dust potato starch on to the surface of cut tofu and deep fry the pieces until golden.
4. Boil noodles according to package directions and remove from water to drain. Boil bean sprouts for 30secs in the same boiling water.
5. Place noodles, heated soya milk soup, bean sprouts, mushrooms, tofu, pumpkin and add chopped spring onion and sesame seeds to garnish. EAT!



When I was still a young vegan, I ate my first soya milk ramen at Cafe Proverbs in Kyoto, Japan. It was amazing.
We can make vegan soya sauce flavor or miso flavor ramen kind of easily, and also we can buy instant one in any supermarket. But I had given up heavy and oily "Tonkotsu" flavor ramen. That time their soya milk ramen saved me from the despair! I think it was one factor to make me start vegan cooking.
This time I tried to make that same taste with ingredients that we can easily find in Scotland. Vegan ramen noodles were the only thing which were difficult to find, but I think you can find them in a big supermarket or a Chinese supermarket.
I didn't add any water because I wanted it to be heavy, but thick soya milk is so delicate so please be careful when cooking. If you boil it, the soya milk will separate. Because of this, it can be difficult to develop the flavor from the vegetables. So, please try to improve the taste carefully and slowly when you cook garlic, ginger, chili and spring onions. If you think the broth is too thick, you can add some water.


Vegan Memo:
- You can use other vegetables (e.g onion, pepper, potato, spinach and so on). But it's difficult to cook them thoroughly in the soup because of the soya milk. Please cook it some other way and add it before you eat.
- This time I tried to use ingredients which are easy to get in Scotland, but you can use soya sauce, miso, mirin and sake to make the taste, of course.
- If you can get vegan chicken stock, I recommend using it.

IMG_0133.jpg

Vegan Spicy Harusame Soup


  • 2011/12/02

'Vegan Spicy Harusame Soup' -- 4 servings

IMGP0808.jpg



INGREDIENTS



200g Harusame (vermicelli)

1200ml vegetable stock

3 Tbls soy sauce

2 Tbls sake
1 Tbls ginger

Salt & pepper to taste
2 Tbls sesame oil
1-3 Tbls chili oil
1 pack enoki mushrooms
1 Large carrot
Half onion
Half pack bean sprout
Fresh coriander to taste
Sesame to taste



Directions:

1. Boil vegetable stock. While you are waiting, cut enoki mushrooms in half lengthwise, Cut the carrots into slices around 3cm long, and slice onion thinly. Add mushrooms, carrots and onion to the vegetable stock.
2. When the stock starts to boil, turn down the heat to low. Add the soy sauce, sake, ginger and cook until the vegetables being soft.
3. Add bean sprouts to the soup and cook for 1-2 minutes more. Add sesame oil, chili oil, and salt and pepper to taste.
4. In a separate pot, prepare harusame noodles: Bring 2 litters of water to boil and add noodles. Cook for around 90 seconds or until softened. Drain noodles in a sieve or colander.
5. Separate and place noodles into 4 bowls. Pour in soup, scatter coriander and sesame seeds on top. Eat!



This time harusame is the main. It's another food we got from the Chinese supermarket. In Japan, harusame has the image of being a low calorie food, but actually it has higher calorie than ramen noodles: about 350 kcal in 100g! But harusame will be bigger in water, so we can be full from eating just a little bit.
So… please be careful to not eat too much harusame!
(My recipe isn't healthy at all! Sorry!)

Vegan Memo:
- Sometimes harusame has already been cut, but usually it's too long to eat. So please cut them before you cook them.
- I recommend that you use ground sesame more than using non-ground sesame. At first, it smells nice. And ground sesame is better for digestion absorption. We can't digest sesame seeds at all.
- If you can't get enoki, you can use usual mushrooms.