Vegan recipes from Scotland
Japanese Vegan in Scotland

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Vegan Tofu Gyoza


  • 2012/03/22

'Vegan Tofu Gyoza' -- 4-6 Servings (36 pieces)

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INGREDIENTS

Filling:
250g firm tofu
350g cabbage (about half a small head)
100g mushrooms
1 medium carrot
1 Tbls sesame oil
3 cloves garlic
Same amount of ginger
1 Tbls soya sauce
1/2 Tbls vegan Worcester sauce
1/2 Tbls sake
Half a vegetable stock cube
2 Tbls potato starch

36 gyoza papers

Gyoza sauce:
4 Tbls soya sauce
3 Tsp rice vinegar
Chili oil if you want to make it spicy


Directions:
1. Mince or dice finely the cabbage, mushrooms, carrot, garlic and ginger. Heat the sesame oil in a frying pan, add the minced cabbage, mushrooms, carrot, garlic, ginger and the pressed tofu. Once the vegetables start to soften, add the soya sauce, worcester sauce, sake and vegetable stock. Mix everything and cook a few mins to allow the flavours to blend.
2. Add the potato starch a little at a time, mixing well. Turn off the heat, and leave the mixture until it's cool enough to touch.
3. Fill the gyoza papers with the vegetable tofu mixture and press the edges together. (Click here to watch the video about how to make gyoza on youtube!)
4. Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan. Place the gyoza seam side up in the frying pan in two or three lines (depending on the size of your frying pan). Add a little water to the pan (up to around 1/3 of the height of gyoza). Cover the pan and cook over high heat.
5. After almost all the water has gone, remove the lid and wait until the bottom of the gyoza brown and remaining water has cooked away. Mix the sauce ingredients, dip your gyoza and EAT!



I made this recipe with ingredients that can be found easily here and in Japan. This recipe can become your basic gyoza recipe I think! I use firm tofu instead of fake meat, but even if you don't use tofu it's still good. Cooking the vegetables before putting the mixture inside the gyoza helps to make them firmer.
You should make a lot of gyoza and have a vegan gyoza party with you friends!!

Vegan Memo:
- The vegetables will reduce by about half after cooking!
- You can use any kind of mushrooms you like.
- You can freeze and keep the leftover gyoza.



Nutrition FactsPer person/6 pieces
Calories - 218.4
Total Fat - 6.7 g
  Saturated Fat - 1.0 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat - 3.1 g
  Monounsaturated Fat - 1.7 g
Cholesterol - 0.0 mg
Sodium - 378.5 mg
  Potassium - 307.1 mg
Total Carbohydrate - 34.6 g
  Dietary Fiber - 3.3 g
  Sugars - 1.5 g
Protein - 12.8 g
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Chickpea Vegan Burger with Teriyaki Sauce


  • 2012/03/12

'Chickpea Vegan Burger with Teriyaki Sauce' -- 4 Servings

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INGREDIENTS

The burger:
400g can chickpeas, drained and rinsed (242g after draining)
1 onion, diced
Half carrot, minced
approx 15 leaves basil, minced
2 Tbls flour
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1 dash nutmeg powder
1/2 Tsp paprika
1 Tsp thyme
1 Tbls olive oil
Pepper to taste

The teriyaki sauce:
6 Tbls sake
6 Tbls mirin
4 Tbld soya sauce
2 Tsp sugar
2 Tbls water

1 Tsp potato starch, mixed with same amount of water


Directions:
1. Heat a little vegetable oil in a frying pan, add minced onion and carrot, fry until the carrot is soft.
2. Place chickpeas in a bowl, mash them with the back of a fork.
3. Place all other ingredients for the burger, fried onion and carrot into the bowl, and mix well. Separate mixture into 4 equal pieces, and shape into burgers.
4. Fry burgers on both sides over medium heat.
5. Mix the ingredients for the teriyaki sauce and pour from the corner of the frying pan, cooking over high heat. After the sauce reduces by half, take the burgers out and add the potato starch/water paste to the pan. Cook and mix for a short time until thickened and smooth. Spread sauce on the burgers. EAT!



I didn't make a vegan burger for a long time. It's easy for the mixture to get too dry if you use chickpeas for vegan burgers, but cooking with teriyaki sauce helps to makes it moist. The teriyaki sauce soaks into the burger a little bit and this burger is already flavoured, so you don't feel like you are eating beans.
If you want to feel the chickpeas texture, you can leave some bits when you mash it.
I decided to give the nutritional info for my recipes using Recipe Calculator from Spark Recipes, so please check it as well!

Vegan Memo:
- You can use other kinds of beans I think, e.g black beans, soya beans and so on.
- You can use dried basil instead of fresh basil if you don't have it.



Nutrition FactsPer person/1 burger
Calories - 232.1
Total Fat - 6.6 g
  Saturated Fat - 1.0 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat - 1.2 g
  Monounsaturated Fat - 4.0 g
Cholesterol - 0.0 mg
Sodium - 997.1 mg
  Potassium - 160.4 mg
Total Carbohydrate - 36.1 g
  Dietary Fiber - 3.0 g
  Sugars - 5.2 g
Protein - 5.0 g
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Takikomi Rice


  • 2012/01/25

"Takikomi" Rice' -- 4 servings

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INGREDIENTS


2 cups Japanese rice
Half carrot
Half pack mushrooms
3 Tbls soya sauce
1 Tbls sake
1 Tbls mirin
405ml water or dashi; the amount to make 2 cups when combined with soya sauce, sake and mirin.
Salt to taste

Directions:

1. Wash the rice, and place it with water or dashi, soya sauce, sake, mirin, chopped carrot and chopped mushrooms into heavy-bottomed pot.
2. Cover the pot, and heat it over strong heat. After the pot starts to release steam, lower the flame (as low as you can), wait 15min. turn up the heat again for 30secs and then turn off. Wait 10mins without opening the pot.
3. Open the pot, mix gently and EAT!



Sometimes I feel like I want to eat takikomi rice until I die. But in the Scotland, I don't have rice cooker, so I used a pot. Of course, it was better than using a rice cooker!
"Takikomi" rice is a famous Japanese home food and also one way to get away from boring everyday white rice. It's like seasoned boiled rice.

For white rice, we should place rice into water and wait some hours to make it softer, but it will be harder if we do it for "takikomi" rice because of salt. So be careful!

You should use the heaviest pot to cook rice in this way. I'm using "LE CREUSET" which is not mine… This kind of cast iron pot is the best choice to simmer something on low heat!

Vegan Memo:
- Of course, you can use other vegetables. Root vegetables such as bamboo roots, lotus root, and burdock are all great if you can find them. Pumpkin and butternut squash are also good for takikomi rice.
- The last 30 sec of cooking is to make "okoge" which are the burned bits. It's the best bit of rice cooked in a pot, so please try it.
- You should not open the pan when you are cooking. It's a Japanese secret!
- The flavor improves with time so if you can wait, it will be more delicious.
- This time, I used rice called "sushi rice" which I got from Chinese supermarket.

Vegan Gratin


  • 2012/01/16

'Vegan Pasta Gratin' -- 4 servings

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INGREDIENTS


2 Tbls margarine
1 onion
1 carrot
Half pack mushrooms
Half head of broccoli
2 Tbls flour

600ml unsweetened soya milk
1 cube vegetable stock
2 Tbls white miso or usual miso paste
Salt and white pepper to taste

180g pasta

1 Tbls olive oil
1 clove garlic
3 Tbls bread crumbs or panko
Vegan cheese to taste
Parsley to taste


Directions:

1. Heat margarine in a heavy bottom pot, add sliced onion and chopped carrot, fry well. After it starts to brown, add sliced mushrooms, broccoli and flour, fry and stir until vegetables are evenly coated and flour is no longer powdery.
2. Add soya milk, vegetable stock and miso, and stop cooking before the mixture starts to boil. Add salt and pepper to taste.
3. Grease the oven dish with olive oil, cut a clove of garlic in half, rub the cut side of the garlic on the oven dish. Place boiled pasta, white sauce, vegan cheese and bread crumbs into the oven dish (in that order), bake until bread crumbs are brown (around 20min in 200 degrees). Place parsley on top of gratin and eat!



Kids like it. Adults like it. It's creamy gratin! For this vegan cream sauce, the sweetness of well cooked onion and the richness of the miso is important. Of course, you can use this recipe for stew, doria (gratin using rice) and so on, and also you can use potatoes, asparagus… or anything instead of pasta, I think.
Gratin is not so complicated and it is easy to make a side dish when you are baking it. So I want people who don't usually cook to challenge themselves and try this recipe.

Vegan Memo:
- If you can't get vegan cheese, you don't need to use it.
- If your vegan cheese is able to melt, you can put it on top of gratin. If your vegan chess is not able to melt, you should add it in the white sauce. Otherwise it will be dried crispy vegan cheese!
- You should try it with hot sauce. It's super delicious!

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Vegan Japanese Curry


  • 2011/12/30

'Vegan Japanese Curry' -- 4 servings

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INGREDIENTS



3 potatoes

1 onion
2 carrots
Half cauliflower
2 Tbls olive oil
3 cloves of garlic, same amount of ginger
3 Tbls curry powder
1 Tsp turmeric powder
1 Tsp cumin powder
2 Tbls flour
Chili powder to taste
800ml water
1 cube of vegetable stock
2 Tbls Bulldog sauce or vegan Worcester sauce (see memo)
2 Tbls ketchup
2 Tbls maple syrup
1 leaf laurel (bay leaf)
Salt & pepper to taste
4 servings rice

Directions:

1. Heat olive oil in frying pan, add minced garlic and ginger. After it starts to smell good, add chopped onion, potatoes and carrot and fry more.
2. Add curry powder, turmeric powder, cumin powder, flour and chili powder and fry it until it stops looking powdery.
3. Add the water and veggie stock and bring to the boil. After it starts boiling, lower the flame and add bulldog sauce, ketchup, maple syrup and laurel and cook until everything becomes soft. Add salt and pepper to taste and eat with rice!



I'm eating Indian curry a lot in Scotland. I'm always thinking about Indian curry.

But I want to eat Japanese curry SOMETIMES! But I want to taste of spice too! So I made this.

Actually, in the UK, Japanese curry roux is sometimes vegan because it will be annoying to import if it contains meat. I was surprised by the foods I can find here that are vegan (e.g. instant ramen). Vegan instant ramen… It must be junk food, but sounds like it's healthy.

Vegan Memo:
- You can get curry powder in the spice section of supermarket.
- Sometimes curry powder is too spicy, so you need to check taste before adding chili powder.
- Bulldog sauce is a bit like British brown sauce. You can find it in well-stocked Asian/Japanese stores or online. It's expensive but you can use it for a lot of Japanese recipes - okonomiyaki, yaki soba, and on tonkatsu etc.
- If you can't get Bulldog sauce, you can use worcester sauce and tonkatsu sauce. I think 1 Tbls soy sauce might be okay too.

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Vegan Spicy Harusame Soup


  • 2011/12/02

'Vegan Spicy Harusame Soup' -- 4 servings

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INGREDIENTS



200g Harusame (vermicelli)

1200ml vegetable stock

3 Tbls soy sauce

2 Tbls sake
1 Tbls ginger

Salt & pepper to taste
2 Tbls sesame oil
1-3 Tbls chili oil
1 pack enoki mushrooms
1 Large carrot
Half onion
Half pack bean sprout
Fresh coriander to taste
Sesame to taste



Directions:

1. Boil vegetable stock. While you are waiting, cut enoki mushrooms in half lengthwise, Cut the carrots into slices around 3cm long, and slice onion thinly. Add mushrooms, carrots and onion to the vegetable stock.
2. When the stock starts to boil, turn down the heat to low. Add the soy sauce, sake, ginger and cook until the vegetables being soft.
3. Add bean sprouts to the soup and cook for 1-2 minutes more. Add sesame oil, chili oil, and salt and pepper to taste.
4. In a separate pot, prepare harusame noodles: Bring 2 litters of water to boil and add noodles. Cook for around 90 seconds or until softened. Drain noodles in a sieve or colander.
5. Separate and place noodles into 4 bowls. Pour in soup, scatter coriander and sesame seeds on top. Eat!



This time harusame is the main. It's another food we got from the Chinese supermarket. In Japan, harusame has the image of being a low calorie food, but actually it has higher calorie than ramen noodles: about 350 kcal in 100g! But harusame will be bigger in water, so we can be full from eating just a little bit.
So… please be careful to not eat too much harusame!
(My recipe isn't healthy at all! Sorry!)

Vegan Memo:
- Sometimes harusame has already been cut, but usually it's too long to eat. So please cut them before you cook them.
- I recommend that you use ground sesame more than using non-ground sesame. At first, it smells nice. And ground sesame is better for digestion absorption. We can't digest sesame seeds at all.
- If you can't get enoki, you can use usual mushrooms.

Vegan Steamed Meat Bun


  • 2011/11/28

'Vegan steamed meat bun' -- 4 servings (8 pieces)

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INGREDIENTS


The dough:

150g plain flour

2 Tbls baking powder

80ml soy milk

2 Tbls sugar

1 Tbls sesame oil

Salt to taste



The filling:

2 Tbs sesame oil
1 clove garlic

4 leaves cabbage

Half medium onion
Half medium carrot

1/3 cup TVP (before you soak it.)
(If you can't get TVP, you can use 100g firm tofu.)

2 Tsp grated ginger

1 Tbls soy sauce

1/2 Tbls vegan Worcester sauce

1 Tbls sake or wine

1 cube vegetable stock

Salt and pepper to taste

1 Tbls potato flour (or cornstarch)



Directions:

1. Place the ingredients for the dough into a mixing bowl, and mix until combined. Cover bowl with cling film, and wait for 1 hour.

2. While you are waiting, make the filling. Heat sesame oil in a frying pan, add minced garlic and ginger. After it start smells nice, add minced vegetables.

3. After those vegetable became soft, add soaked TVP (or pressed firm tofu), soy sauce, worcester sauce, sake and vegetable stock, mix and continue to fry. Add salt and pepper to taste.

4. Add the potato flour or cornstarch to the mince, mix well. Turn off the heat and allow to cool slightly (if the mixture is too hot you will burn your fingers when filling the buns!).
5. Separate dough into 8 equal pieces, roll each in to a ball, and roll out flat with a rolling pin (or heavy bottle, jar etc.). Place the filling into the centre of each dough circle and begin forming the bun shape.

6. Place buns in a steamer basket or bamboo steamer. To prevent the buns from sticking to your steaming apparatus, place a cabbage leaf or square of greaseproof paper under each bun. Steam buns for 13 minutes. Eat!



I decided to make this because I wanted to use the bamboo steamer I got from the chinese supermarket we went to last week.

When I lived in Japan, fake meat was too expensive to buy, so I just made steamed vegetable buns. But now, finally, I could upgrade to vegan steamed meat bun! Now I can buy TVP 10 mins walk from my house, so I can use it whenever I want. And it's cheap. It was £1.70 for 500g. In Japan, it would be around £15…

Usually people use a mixture of strong flour and usual plain flour to make the dough, but before we moved to Scotland I didn't want to buy the strong kind since I don't use it that much. And I'm too lazy to wait for the dough to rise. These two bad personality traits lead me to making dough which is only using plain flour and a lot of baking powder, haha.

Vegan Memo:
- If you can't get fake meat, you can also use momen tofu or just use more vegetables.
- If you are living in Japan, you can use takana for a more authentic steamed bun taste.
- On step 6, you can use flour on your hands and the table/worktop surface if it's too sticky.
- The dough will be so big, so you should try to make it as thin as you can.
- The easiest way to form the bun's shape is by working your way around the circle of dough, pulling up a piece at a time and pinching it at the top.This is the method I use but really, as long as it's closed, you can make the bun whatever shape you like!

Before steaming:
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